June 18, 2024
Pregnant Women with Low Socioeconomic

Pregnant Women with Low Socioeconomic Status More Prone to Exposure of Thyroid-Disrupting Chemicals: New Study

According to recent research, pregnant women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are at a higher risk of being exposed to chemicals that can disrupt thyroid function. The study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, highlights the need for targeted interventions to protect this vulnerable population.

The researchers analyzed data from the National Health and Diabetes Nutrition¬†Examination Survey (NHANES) between 2003 and 2010. They identified 1,453 pregnant women and measured their urinary concentrations of perchlorate, a common thyroid-disrupting chemical. The team also assessed each woman’s socioeconomic status based on factors like income, education, and employment.

The findings revealed that pregnant women from low socioeconomic backgrounds had significantly higher levels of perchlorate in their urine compared to those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. This disparity remained even after adjusting for other factors, such as age, race, and body mass index.

The researchers emphasized that the higher exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals could have serious consequences for the developing fetus. Thyroid hormones are crucial for brain development, and disruptions can lead to cognitive and developmental issues.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Jennifer Webb, stated, “Our findings underscore the importance of addressing environmental health inequities during pregnancy. Pregnant women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are disproportionately affected by environmental contaminants, and it’s essential that we take steps to protect them and their developing babies.”

The researchers called for more research to identify the sources of these chemicals and develop strategies to reduce exposure. They also urged policymakers to consider targeted interventions to protect pregnant women from low socioeconomic backgrounds and promote environmental justice.

The study highlights the urgent need to address the environmental health disparities faced by pregnant women from low socioeconomic backgrounds. The higher exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals could have long-term consequences for the health of both mothers and their developing babies. Further research and targeted interventions are necessary to mitigate this risk and promote a healthier future for all.

*Note:
1. Source: Coherent Market Insights, Public sources, Desk research
2. We have leveraged AI tools to mine information and compile it.