April 22, 2024

Perovskite Solar Cell Technology Advancements with Antimony

Researchers from the Center for Hybrid and Organic Solar Energy (CHOSE) at Tor Vergata University of Rome have made significant progress in the development of perovskite solar cells. The team has successfully created the first air-stable lead (Pb) and tin (Sn)-free perovskite solar modules, using an antimony (Sb)-based perovskite-inspired material (PIM) as the light absorber. This breakthrough addresses the potential toxicity of lead and offers a stable alternative to tin-based perovskites.

The results of their research have been published in the journal ACS Energy Letters. The Sb-based perovskite-inspired material photovoltaic cells aim to overcome a major hurdle in perovskite technology, which is the potential environmental concern associated with lead. Additionally, the stability of tin-based perovskites is an ongoing challenge due to their sensitivity to air, making processing difficult.

To enhance the efficiency and stability of the Sb-based MA1.5Cs1.5Sb2I3Cl6 solar cells, the researchers introduced two cations into the precursor mixture. These modifications resulted in an impressive 81% improvement in power conversion efficiencies compared to conventional Cs-only counterparts, reaching a PCE of 1.5%. Furthermore, the research team observed a 60% increase in long-term stability, with only a 10% loss after approximately 1,800 hours of aging in air.

The remarkable air stability, combined with thermal durability at high temperatures of 85°C in air, allowed the researchers to perform all three scalable laser patterning steps (P1, P2, and P3) in an air environment. This eliminates the need for a glovebox and simplifies the manufacturing process, reducing costs associated with module patterning and manufacturing.

Moving forward, future investigations will focus on further increasing the efficiencies of these types of cells. The researchers believe that their discoveries have opened up new possibilities for large-scale production of greener photovoltaics. Their innovative approach addresses concerns related to lead and offers a stable alternative to tin-based perovskites. This breakthrough could potentially revolutionize the solar energy industry and contribute to the development of more sustainable energy solutions.

In conclusion, the research team led by CHOSED at Tor Vergata University of Rome has successfully developed air-stable perovskite solar modules using antimony-based materials. This breakthrough addresses the potential toxicity and instability challenges associated with lead and tin-based perovskites. The introduction of two cations into the precursor mixture significantly improved the efficiency and stability of the solar cells. The researchers were able to carry out all three scalable laser patterning steps in an air environment, simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing costs. This research opens up new possibilities for large-scale production of greener photovoltaics and holds the potential to reshape the solar energy industry.

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1. Source: Coherent Market Insights, Public sources, Desk research
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