May 18, 2024
Chronic Lung Disease in Premature Babies

Azithromycin’s Role in Preventing Chronic Lung Disease in Premature Babies: A Large-Scale Clinical Trial

A landmark clinical trial led by Professor Sailesh Kotecha at Cardiff University School of Medicine has shed new light on the potential of azithromycin in preventing chronic lung disease in prematurely born infants.

Chronic lung disease, also known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, is a prevalent condition among newborns born prematurely. This neonatal lung condition can lead to substantial mortality and long-term health complications, including the potential development of chronic obstructive lung disease later in life.

Despite advancements in neonatal care, the incidence of chronic lung disease has remained relatively stable. This condition primarily affects infants born before 30 weeks of gestation.

The debate surrounding the use of macrolide antibiotics, which include azithromycin, in reducing the occurrence of chronic lung disease in premature babies has been ongoing for several decades. Previous smaller trials have attempted to determine the efficacy of azithromycin in this regard, but their results have been inconsistent.

Recognizing the need for a definitive answer, Professor Kotecha and his team designed a large-scale clinical trial to investigate the potential of azithromycin in preventing chronic lung disease in premature infants.

Professor Kotecha explained, “Chronic lung disease is a significant health concern for prematurely born babies, leading to both short-term and long-term complications. Despite advancements in neonatal care, the rates of this condition have remained largely unchanged. Given the conflicting results from previous smaller trials, we aimed to conduct a large-scale study to determine once and for all whether azithromycin can decrease the incidence of chronic lung disease in premature infants.”

The findings from this groundbreaking trial are expected to provide valuable insights into the role of azithromycin in the prevention and management of chronic lung disease in prematurely born babies.

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1. Source: Coherent Market Insights, Public sources, Desk research
2. We have leveraged AI tools to mine information and compile it